Dryer Takes Too Long to Dry

  • Troubleshooting

    Video Tutorial

    Note: The information here is general and may not be specific to your machine. If you need help with choosing the correct parts for your model, you can contact us using the tech support form here or calling our parts support team at 1-323-490-1805. If you leave a message, we'll get back to you within 24 hours.


    Is the lint screen/filter clogged?

    Remove the lint screen and clean it. Reinsert. Be sure to clean the lint filter after every use.

    Is anything blocking the ventilation system?

    Check the vents and ducting to make sure nothing is obstructing the exhaust.

    Are the clothes too wet after washing?

    The washing might simply be dialed in to the wrong setting. Make sure the washer is set appropriately for the load size. For example, if you use the normal wash speed for an oversize load, the washer may not spin fast enough to remove water, which will increase the necessary drying time.

    Is the dryer too full?

    Dry only one load of clothes at a time.

    Is the dryer not full enough?

    If there aren't enough clothes in the dryer and the dryer isn't level, the clothes could be resting in the back of the machine. If you're drying just one article of clothing, add a few more items to ensure proper tumbling.

    Thermal Fuse

    The thermal fuse prevents the dryer from getting too hot by interrupting the power supply. But once it's blown, the dryer won't operate without a replacement. Check the fuse, and if it's blown, remove it and install a new one.

    Heating Element

    The heating element is a wire coil in a metal chamber, and is what generates the heat for the dryer. If the heating element is faulty, there won't be any heat.

    To access the part, you'll need to remove the rear panel. Use your multimeter to test for continuity. If it's no good, replace it.

    Cycling Thermostat and High Limit Thermostat

    The cycling thermostat's role is control the temperature inside the dryer. It does this by cycling the heating element on and off. Over time, the part can become faulty and then unable to maintain proper heat in the dryer drum.

    The cycling thermostat is typically located on the blower housing or another part in the internal ducting. Test the part for continuity with a multimeter, and if it's not working, replace the part.

    The high limit thermostat is similar to the thermal fuse in that it prevents the dryer from getting too hot. The high limit thermostat is tripped when the exhaust vent is blocked or restricted. This part isn't meant to cycle repeatedly like the cycling thermostat, so it will eventually fail. Use your multimeter to test the part, and replace it if necessary.

    Temperature Sensor

    Instead of a cycling thermostat, some dryers have a temperature sensor to maintain the correct heat inside the dryer. This part will adjust electrical resistance to the machine, depending on the temperature.

    To check this, you'll need to remove the part and use a multimeter to to test.

    Dryer Timer

    The dryer timer advances either incrementally or sporadically, depending on the cycle you have running. On a timed cycle, it'll advance bit by bit. But on an automatic cycle, it's normal for the timer to move sporadically.

    It's possible for a dryer timer to wear out. The timer connects to the dryer motor and heat circuit, so if the timer wears out, the dryer may not produce enough heat to dry your load. Test your timer for continuity with a multimeter, and replace it if you find it's defective.

    Burner System

    The igniter, radiant sensor, gas control valve, and coils work together to make up the burner system.

    The igniter heats up and ignites the gas, which produces the heat needed to dry your load of clothes. The igniter is found inside the dryer, near the gas valve burner tube. It can be shaped like a coil, or flat, depending on your dryer make and model. They're fragile, so be very careful when testing it.

    The radiant sensor measures heat from the igniter or burner, and controls the gas valve. It'll have the valve release more gas when more heat is needed, and if it's defective, your dryer won't get hot enough to dry your clothes.

    Use your multimter on each of these three parts to check for continuity. If any are defective, replace the part.